Karlsruhe in the 20th Century

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Karlsruhe in the 20th Century

After the revolution of 1918 the state of Baden became a republic and Karlsruhe lost its status as the monarch's residence. After a short period of progress during the Weimar Republic - the Bauhaus-Architect, Walter Gropius lead the building of the Dammerstock settlement, Michelin set up a branch in Karlsruhe - the democratically elected town council was dissolved by the National Socialists. Any opposition was persecuted under their regime; and Jews were excluded from society and deported to extermination camps. In 1938 both of Karlsruhe's synagogues were set alight. After a war begun by the National Socialists and after more than fifty air raids, 35 % of the city was destroyed.

Since then the townscape has changed: the civil service city, the former capital of Baden, became an industrial and economic centre with 276,000 inhabitants (1997). Karlsruhe became the “Residence of justice” with the opening of the Federal High Court in 1950 and the Federal Constitutional Court in 1951. Petrochemical and electronic industries have settled here, and the Hi-Tech area is meanwhile becoming ever more important. The TechnologieRegion Karlsruhe and the Technologiepark (Technology Park of Karlsruhe) were founded in 1987, and the Centre for Art and Media was opened in 1997.

See also